Tag: Cyber Threats

The attack surface is growing faster than it has at any other point in the history of technology

Avast launched its annual Threat Landscape Report, detailing the biggest security trends facing consumers in 2019 as collected by the Avast Threat Labs team.

“This year, we celebrated the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web. Fast forward thirty years and the threat landscape is exponentially more complex, and the available attack surface is growing faster than it has at any other point in the history of technology,” commented Ondrej Vlcek, President of Consumer at Avast.

Read about the findings of the new Avast report on Help Net Security.

Attacks Against Critical Infrastructure Poise to Reshape Cyber Landscape

Over the last couple of years, we have seen a marked shift in cyber-attacks. Traditionally, hackers have focused on theft; stealing data is easily monetizable, which meant that headline attacks tended to involve the breach of personal information or intellectual property. But now a new kind of threat is on the rise.  Attacks now involve sabotaging and disrupting the technology systems that support manufacturing, energy generation, and transportation.

Hackers have increasingly focused their attention to breaking into industrial environments. Against the ongoing backdrop of cyber conflict between nation states and escalating warnings from the Department of Homeland Security, critical infrastructure is becoming a central target for threat actors.

Read more about critical infrastructure attacks on SecurityWeek.

Five Cyber Security Predictions for 2019

In businesses around the world, 2018 showed us that cyber security vulnerabilities continue to grow and evolve. The business impact and complexity of managing cyber security is increasing dramatically, as is the need to justify cyber security investments and provide reporting relevant to the business to prove the value of those investments.

Advances in technology like artificial intelligence and machine learning accelerate the pace of new, data-driven solutions, but this can be a dual-edged sword as bad actors can leverage them into more sophisticated attacks on companies that are just trying to stay abreast of current threats.

Read about the cybersecurity predictions for 2019 by Adrian Nish, Head of Threat Intelligence at BAE Systems, on BAE Systems.

Cyberwar predictions for 2019: The stakes have been raised

Before the internet era, geopolitical tensions drove traditional espionage, and periodically erupted into warfare. Nowadays, cyberspace not only houses a treasure-trove of commercially and politically sensitive information, but can also provide access to control systems for critical civil and military infrastructure.

It’s therefore no surprise to find nation-state cyber activity high on the agendas of governments. In 2019, nation-state cyber activity is expected to increase to unprecedented levels.

Read more about the predictions for nation-state cyber activity in 2019 on ZDNet.

The Most Dangerous People on the Internet in 2018

This year thankfully avoided any world-breaking ransomware attacks like NotPetya. It even had some small victories, like GitHub beating back the biggest DDoS attack in history. Still, online threats are manifold, lurking and evolving, making the internet a more hostile place than ever.

The biggest threats online continued to mirror the biggest threats in the real world, with nation states fighting proxy battles and civilians bearing the brunt of the assault. In many cases, the most dangerous people online are also the most dangerous in the real world. The distinction has never mattered less.

Read the list of most dangerous people on the Internet for 2018 on Wired.

JungleSec Ransomware Infects Victims Through IPMI Remote Consoles

A ransomware called JungleSec is infecting victims through unsecured IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface) cards since early November.

When originally reported in early November, victims were seen using Windows, Linux, and Mac, but there was no indication as to how they were being infected. Since then, BleepingComputer has spoken to multiple victims whose Linux servers were infected with the JungleSec Ransomware and they all stated the same thing; they were infected through unsecured IPMI devices.

Read more about JungleSec ransomware on BleepingComputer.

Five Ways 2019 Can Be Very Different for Cybersecurity

Cyber security’s 2018 megatrends and myriad emerging threats have created the perfect storm for a tumultuous 2019.

From never-before-seen attacks on newly engineered biometric markers and the broad embrace of blockchain, to expanded risks posed for “new” critical infrastructure and the transfer of trust, organizations must look to the threat horizon, and accelerate and collaborate to out-innovate and out-maneuver the attackers.

Read about five security predictions to prepare for as we head into 2019, on CDO Trends.

Huawei calls for evidence against company to be shown: Report

Huawei has told reporters that any evidence against the company should be revealed. “Maybe not to Huawei and maybe not to the public, but to telecom operators, because they are the ones that buy Huawei,” Chairman Ken Hu said. The Associated Press reported Hu said there has never been evidence of Huawei equipment being a risk, and the company has never “accepted requests to damage the networks or business of any of our customers”.

The call follows the Czech Republic’s national cybersecurity agency issuing a warning over the use of Huawei and ZTE earlier this week. The National Cyber and Information Security Agency (NCISA) said the security threat from the two firms’ products mainly comes down to China’s legal and political system for companies headquartered there.

Read more about this story on ZDNet.

The state of cyberwarfare: 2 things you need to know

Cybersecurity headlines in recent years have been dominated by companies losing money by being hacked and leaking the data of millions of customers. But today, cybersecurity is moving beyond the financial impact to concerns over public safety, national security, and even cyberwarfare.

To understand the state of cyberwar and its potential impact, we should all keep in mind two things:

  1. The proliferation of cyberweapons is already happening
  2. Arms control of cyberweapons hasn’t caught up

Read more about the current state of cyberwarfare on ZDNet.