Category: China

Huawei calls for evidence against company to be shown: Report

Huawei has told reporters that any evidence against the company should be revealed. “Maybe not to Huawei and maybe not to the public, but to telecom operators, because they are the ones that buy Huawei,” Chairman Ken Hu said. The Associated Press reported Hu said there has never been evidence of Huawei equipment being a risk, and the company has never “accepted requests to damage the networks or business of any of our customers”.

The call follows the Czech Republic’s national cybersecurity agency issuing a warning over the use of Huawei and ZTE earlier this week. The National Cyber and Information Security Agency (NCISA) said the security threat from the two firms’ products mainly comes down to China’s legal and political system for companies headquartered there.

Read more about this story on ZDNet.

China On The March: Cybersecurity And Hidden Risks

The recent arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer Wanzhou in Canada at the request of U.S. officials over unspecified accusations is just the latest example of countries attempting to contain Chinese ambitions, often expressed through that country’s state-owned companies. It was widely reported that Huawei may have broken U.S. sanctions by doing business with Iran.

Trouble for the company worsened over the last week when the Wall Street Journal reported that spy chiefs from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the U.K., and the United States agreed during a July meeting that the company’s influence needed to be limited.

Read more about the growing concerns about China’s ambitions, including its attempts to infiltrate the U.S. transportation industry, on Forbes.

Chinese Hackers Breach U.S. Navy Contractors

Chinese hackers are breaching Navy contractors to steal everything from ship-maintenance data to missile plans, officials and experts said, triggering a top-to-bottom review of cyber vulnerabilities. A series of incidents in the past 18 months has pointed out the service’s weaknesses, highlighting what some officials have described as some of the most debilitating cyber campaigns linked to Beijing.

Cyberattacks affect all branches of the armed forces but contractors for the Navy and the Air Force are viewed as choice targets for hackers seeking advanced military technology, officials said. Navy contractors have suffered especially troubling breaches over the past year, one U.S. official said.

Read more about the series of cyberattacks on The Wall Street Journal.

U.S. Believes Chinese Intelligence Behind Marriott Hack

The United States said that China was behind the massive hack of data from hotel giant Marriott, part of an ongoing global campaign of cyber-theft run by Beijing. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo confirmed to Fox News that the government believes China masterminded the Marriott data theft. “They have committed cyber attacks across the world,” he said.

“We consider them a strategic competitor. They are taking actions in the South China Sea. They’re conducting espionage and influence operations here in the United States,” he said. The Marriott hacking allegation came amid heightened tensions between Beijing and Washington that encompasses geopolitics, trade, technology rivalry and espionage.

Read more about this developing story on SecurityWeek.

Why Microsoft is fighting to stop a cyber world war

Two days last year finally woke the world up to the dangers of cyberwarfare, according to Microsoft’s President Brad Smith: 12 May and 26 June. On 12 May the WannaCry ransomware attack created havoc by encrypting PCs across the world and costing billions to repair the damage. Just over a month later on 16 June the NotPetya malware caused more damage, again costing billions to fix. Western governments have blamed WannaCry on North Korea, and NotPetya on Russia — it probably was designed as an attack on Ukraine which then got out of hand.

Smith draws a parallel between the run-up to the First World War and the burgeoning cyberwar arms race today. “I’m not here to say the next world war is imminent but I am here to say that there are lessons from a century ago we can learn and apply, that we need to apply, to our own future,” said Smith.

Read more about Microsoft’s efforts to stop a cyber world war on ZDNet.

Super Micro Says It Found No Secret Spy Chips on Motherboards

Super Micro has found no evidence of malicious microchips on its motherboards, according to a statement by the company that was released to customers. The audit of Super Micro hardware comes on the heels of a scandalous report that Chinese spies had allegedly installed secret microchips on motherboards that were used in servers operated by giant tech companies like Apple and government agencies like the CIA.

The bizarre report, published by Bloomberg Businessweek this past October after a year-long investigation, alleged that Chinese spies were able to spy on sensitive American servers, but the article was met with immediate and aggressive push-back by the companies involved.

Read more about the findings of the Super Micro audit on Gizmodo.

China summons US ambassador and warns of ‘grave consequences’ if Huawei’s CFO is not released

China summoned the US ambassador to Beijing to protest Canada’s detention of a senior executive of Chinese electronics giant Huawei at Washington’s behest, demanding the US cancel the order for her arrest.

The official Xinhua News Agency said Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng “lodged solemn representations and strong protests” with Ambassador Terry Branstad on Sunday against the detention of Huawei’s chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou. Meng, who is reportedly suspected of trying to evade US trade curbs on Iran, was detained on Dec. 1 in Vancouver, Canada.

Read more about the new developments in this story on Business Insider.

Clues in Marriott hack implicate China – sources

Hackers behind a massive breach at hotel group Marriott International Inc (MAR.O) left clues suggesting they were working for a Chinese government intelligence gathering operation, according to sources familiar with the matter.

Marriott said last week that a hack that began four years ago had exposed the records of up to 500 million customers in its Starwood hotels reservation system. Private investigators looking into the breach have found hacking tools, techniques and procedures previously used in attacks attributed to Chinese hackers, said three sources who were not authorized to discuss the company’s private probe into the attack.

Read more about the alleged clues suggesting Chinese involvement in the attack on Reuters.

Arrest of Tech Exec Signals Tougher US Stand on China Tech Firms

The arrest of a top executive of tech giant Huawei at the request of US authorities signals a toughening stand in Washington on dealing with Chinese tech firms amid longstanding concerns over cyberespionage.

Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer, was detained this week in Canada and faces an extradition request from US authorities over an investigation into suspected Iran sanctions violations by the Chinese technology giant. Meng is the daughter of company founder Ren Zhengfei, a former Chinese People’s Liberation Army engineer.

Read more about the arrest of Huawei’s CFO on SecurityWeek.

The state of cyberwarfare: 2 things you need to know

Cybersecurity headlines in recent years have been dominated by companies losing money by being hacked and leaking the data of millions of customers. But today, cybersecurity is moving beyond the financial impact to concerns over public safety, national security, and even cyberwarfare.

To understand the state of cyberwar and its potential impact, we should all keep in mind two things:

  1. The proliferation of cyberweapons is already happening
  2. Arms control of cyberweapons hasn’t caught up

Read more about the current state of cyberwarfare on ZDNet.