DDoS explained: How distributed denial of service attacks are evolving

A distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack is when an attacker, or attackers, attempt to make it impossible for a service to be delivered. This can be achieved by thwarting access to virtually anything: servers, devices, services, networks, applications, and even specific transactions within applications. In a DoS attack, it’s one system that is sending the malicious data or requests; a DDoS attack comes from multiple systems.

Generally, these attacks work by drowning a system with requests for data. This could be sending a web server so many requests to serve a page that it crashes under the demand, or it could be a database being hit with a high volume of queries. The result is available internet bandwidth, CPU and RAM capacity becomes overwhelmed.

The impact could range from a minor annoyance from disrupted services to experiencing entire websites, applications, or even entire business taken offline.

Read more about denial-of-service attacks, which have been part of the criminal toolbox for twenty years, and how they’re only growing more prevalent and stronger, on CSO.

Track the strategic threats to your business with the Threat Brief, delivered to your email daily.

Subscribe Here