CIGslip Lets Attackers Bypass Microsoft Code Integrity Guard

A new attack method lets attackers bypass Microsoft’s Code Integrity Guard (CIG) and inject malicious code into protected processes, including Microsoft Edge. Researchers at Morphisec this week disclosed the details of the technique and proof-of-concept code. CIG is a mitigation that was first introduced in Windows 10 in 2015, and later became part of Device Guard. It restricts loaded images to those signed by Microsoft, WQL, and in some cases, the Microsoft Store.

This technique, dubbed CIGslip, was discovered by researchers learning how to protect the Edge browser, explains Michael Gorelik, CTO and vice president of R&D at Morphisec. Edge is protected by CIG, as are several processes in the latest version of Windows 10. CIGslip bypasses CIG’s security mechanisms while mimicking natural Windows DLL loading from the disk. The technique abuses a non-CIG enabled process, the most popular form of process on Windows, to inject code into a CIG-protected target process. This serves as an entry point for an attacker to load any kind of code, malicious or benign, into Microsoft Edge.

Read more about the CIGslip technique which would enable attackers to inject malicious content into Microsoft Edge and other protected processes on DarkReading.

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